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HASS-E Explores solutions to present-day challenges by studying social, cultural, political, economic, environmental, and technological events.

Examines the inter-relatedness of these events from a philosophical as well as a mathematical modeling perspective.Emulates real-world, large-scale environmental project systems development Students interested in writing a thesis for honors consideration enroll in the HRTS UN3996 Human Rights Thesis Seminar in the spring semester of their senior year. The course will consist of group sessions, where students will present their work and participate in discussions, as well as individual meetings with their thesis  .Emulates real-world, large-scale environmental project systems development.

Curriculum centers on a case study of Boston Harbor and an open-ended research problem.Students work in teams to study current needs, and then investigate plausible, symbiotic, systems-oriented solutions for going forward.005 Introduction to International Development Prereq: None 3-0-9 units.HASS-S Introduces the political economy of international economic development planning, using an applied, quantitative approach.Considers why some countries are able to develop faster than others.Presents major theories and models of development and underdevelopment, providing tools to understand the mechanisms and processes behind economic growth and broader notions of progress.Offers an alternative view of development, focusing on the persistence of dichotomies in current theory and practice.

Using specific cases, explores how different combinations of actors and institutions at various scales may promote or inhibit economic development.Students re-examine conventional knowledge and engage critically with the assumptions behind current thinking and policy.206 Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall) 3-0-9 units.HASS-S Explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the US within a global context.

Examines the impacts of recent economic restructuring and globalization.Reviews current debates about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.HASS-S Introduction to negotiation theory and practice.Applications in government, business, and nonprofit settings are examined.Combines a "hands-on" personal skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent theory.Strategy, communications, ethics, and institutional influences are examined as they shape the ability of actors to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests.HASS-S Reviews and analyzes federal and state regulation of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, green-house gas emissions, and the production and use of toxic chemicals.Analyzes pollution as an economic problem and the failure of markets.Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions.Emphasizes use of legal mechanisms and alternative approaches (such as economic incentives and voluntary approaches) to control pollution and encourage chemical accident and pollution prevention.

Focuses on the major federal legislation, the underlying administrative system, and the common law in analyzing environmental policy, economic consequences, and the role of the courts.Discusses classical pollutants and toxic industrial chemicals, green-house gas emissions, community right-to-know, and environmental justice.Develops basic legal skills: how to read/understand cases, regulations, and statutes.Students taking graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.011 or permission of instructor U (Spring) 3-0-9 units.HASS-S Building on the skills and strategies honed in 11.011, explores advanced negotiation through theory and practice.

Emphasizes an experiential, personal skill-building approach, underpinned by foundational and cutting-edge research.Examines applications in management, public policy, social entrepreneurship, international diplomacy, and scientific discovery.Strengthens collaborative decision-making, communication, and leadership skills while enhancing students' ability to proactively frame conflicts, analyze problems, engage stakeholders, create value, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes.HASS-S Explores the physical, ecological, technological, political, economic and cultural implications of big plans and mega-urban landscapes in a global context.Uses local and international case studies to understand the process of making major changes to urban landscape and city fabric, and to regional landscape systems.Includes lectures by leading practitioners.Assignments consider planning and design strategies across multiple scales and time frames.HASS-S; CI-H One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings.Topics include education and media, education reform, the history of education, simulations, games, and the digital divide.Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching.Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class d to 25.

HASS-S; CI-H One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings.Topics include student misconceptions, formative assessment, standards and standardized testing, multiple intelligences, and educational technology.Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching.Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class d to 25.

HASS-H Immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games.Explores the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer-based (desktop and handheld) and non-computer-based media.In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

All levels of computer experience welcome.

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Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.HASS-H; CI-H Surveys important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present, using film as a lens to explore and interpret aspects of the urban experience in the US and abroad.Topics include industrialization, demographics, diversity, the environment, and the relationship between the community and the individual Through a combination of college-wide distribution requirements and major field requirements in their chosen discipline, Lehigh Arts and Sciences students   of urban or regional planning might wish to structure a special major consisting primarily of courses in political science, environmental studies, sociology, or any  .Topics include industrialization, demographics, diversity, the environment, and the relationship between the community and the individual.

Films vary from year to year but always include a balance of classics from the history of film, an occasional experimental/avant-garde film, and a number of more recent, mainstream movies.Students taking undergraduate version complete writing assignments that focus on observation, analysis, and the essay, and give an oral d to 18.HASS-S Examines developmental dynamics of rapidly urbanizing locales, with a special focus on the developing world 2 days ago - Students were thesis comparison essay placed on projects using if necessary and dif - ference is not properly developed. Dutton, t. Ibid.   Despite their differing ethnic origins, students have equal chances of getting a college fraternity.   Instrumental music learning settings and urban planning. Another  .HASS-S Examines developmental dynamics of rapidly urbanizing locales, with a special focus on the developing world.Case studies from India, China, Mexico, Brazil, and South Africa form the basis for discussion of social, spatial, political and economic changes in cities spurred by the decline of industry, the rise of services, and the proliferation of urban mega projects.Emphasizes the challenges of growing urban inequality, environmental risk, citizen displacement, insufficient housing, and the lack of effective institutions for metropolitan governance.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

HASS-S Analyzes implications of economic globalization for communities, regions, international businesses and economic development organizations.Uses spatial analysis techniques to model the role of energy resources in shaping international political economy.Investigates key drivers of human, physical, and social capital flows and their roles in modern human settlement systems.Surveys contemporary models of industrialization and places them in geographic context.

Connects forces of change with their implications for the distribution of wealth and human well-being.484 Credit cannot also be received for 11.355 Presents a theory of comparative differences in international housing outcomes.

Introduces institutional differences in the ways housing expenditures are financed, and the economic determinants of housing outcomes, such as construction costs, land values, housing quality, and ownership rates.Analyzes the flow of funds to and from the different national housing finance sectors.Develops an understanding of the greater financial and macroeconomic implications of the mortgage credit sector, and how policies affect the ways housing asset fluctuations impact national economies.Considers the perspective of investors in international real estate markets and the risks and rewards involved.Draws on lessons from an international comparative approach, and applies them to economic and finance policies at the local, state/provincial, and federal levels within a country of choice.

Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Saiz 2-0-7 units Discusses China's daunting urban challenges: congestion and smog, housing affordability, land reform and urban financing, migrants and locals, and social and spatial inequality.

Provides examples of laudable achievements and diverse and innovative responses across more than six hundred cities.Presents China's urbanization as the joint result of natural socioeconomic processes and conscious actions by governments, markets, and the public.Presents multidisciplinary approaches and alternative narratives.Examines the intricate interaction between state and market in China's context, yielding a variety of state-market 'cocktails' devised and experimented in different cities in response to local problems, each involving a multilayered projection onto urban space.

Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

HASS-S Examines globally relevant challenges of adequately and effectively attending to public sector responsibilities for basic services with limited resources.Particular attention to the contexts of fiscal crises and rapid population growth, as well as shrinkage, through an introduction to methods and processes of budgeting, accounting, and financial mobilization.

Case studies and practice exercises explore revenue strategies, demonstrate fiscal analytical competencies, and familiarize students with pioneering examples of promising budget and accounting processes and innovative funding mobilization via taxation, capital markets, and other mechanisms (e.Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.368 3-0-9 units Examines the behavioral foundation for policy design using urban transportation examples.Introduces multiple frameworks for understanding behavior while contrasting the perspectives of classic economic theory with behavioral economics and social psychology.Suggests corresponding policy interventions and establishes a mapping across behavior, theory, and policy.Presents a spectrum of instruments for positively influencing behavior and improving welfare.

Challenges students to critique, design, implement and interpret experiments that nudge travel behavior.Brings behavioral insights to creative design of transport policies that are efficient and equitable as well as simple, consistent, transparent, acceptable, and adaptive to behavioral changes.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Zhao Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall) 4-0-8 units.

Warshaw Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 3-0-9 units.HASS-S Focuses on the politics of making local, state, national and international decisions on energy and the environment.Topics include implementing energy efficiency measures, siting nuclear and alternative energy plants, promoting oil and gas development offshore and in wilderness, adapting to climate change, handling toxic waste, protecting endangered species, and conserving water.Case studies include Cape Wind, disputes over oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, the response to Hurricane Katrina, and efforts to craft and comply with the greenhouse gas emissions limits.

Staff Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 2-0-10 units.HASS-S Provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the history, foundation, structure, and operation of the human rights movement.Focuses on key ideas, actors, methods and sources, and critically evaluates the field.Addresses current debates in human rights, including the relationship with security, democracy, development and globalization, urbanization, equality (in housing and other economic and social rights; women's rights; ethnic, religious and racial discrimination; and policing/conflict), post-conflict rebuilding and transitional justice, and technology in human rights activism.No prior coursework needed, but work experience, or community service that demonstrates familiarity with global affairs or engagement with ethics and social justice issues, preferred.

Students taking graduate version are expected to write a research paper.Rajagopal Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units Explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the US within a global context.

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Examines the impacts of recent economic restructuring and globalization.Reviews current debates about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security.

Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments In addition the Director of Studies will be very happy to give additional information about Geography entry to the College. He may be contacted by writing to Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, CB3 ODG, or on the telephone number or email address given below. Further information about this subject can be found on the  .Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Glasmeier Prereq: Permission of instructor 4-2-6 units Develops logical, empirically based arguments using statistical techniques and analytic methods.Covers elementary statistics, probability, and other types of quantitative reasoning useful for description, estimation, comparison, and explanation How to purchase custom thesis urban studies Harvard single spaced Custom writing Platinum.Covers elementary statistics, probability, and other types of quantitative reasoning useful for description, estimation, comparison, and explanation.Emphasizes the use and limitations of analytical techniques in planning cted to MCP students How to purchase custom thesis urban studies Harvard single spaced Custom writing Platinum.

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Zhao Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 2-0-7 units Can be repeated for credit.Students bring their writing from other classes to the workshop to practice reviewing and rewriting skills and make several oral presentations.Different types of writing including proposals, memos, thesis, press releases, and writing sound bites for the media.

Abbanat Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-9 units Develops skills in research design for policy analysis and planning.Emphasizes the logic of the research process and its constituent elements.Topics include philosophy of science, question formulation, hypothesis generation and theory construction, data collection techniques (e.

experimental, survey, interview), ethical issues in research, and research proposal d to doctoral students in Course 11.Carolini Prereq: None 3-3-6 units Surveys uses of qualitative methods in urban design and planning research and practice.Topics include observing environments, physical traces, and environmental behavior; asking questions; focused interviews; standardized questionnaires; use of written archival materials; use of visual materials, including photographs, new media, and maps; case studies; and comparative methods.Emphasizes use of each of these skills to collect and make sense of qualitative data in community and institutional settings.

Staff Prereq: None 2-0-4 units Introduces students to participatory action research (PAR), an approach to research and inquiry that enables communities to examine and address consequential societal problems.Explores theoretical and practical questions at the heart of partnerships between applied social scientists and community partners.Focus includes the history of PAR and action research; debates regarding PAR as a form of applied social science; and practical, political, and ethical questions in the practice of PAR.Guides students through an iterative process for developing their own personal theories of practice.236 or permission of instructor G (Spring; partial term) 3-0-3 units Focuses on co-designing and co-conducting research with community partners at various stages of the research process; examination of actual cases in which PAR-like methods have been used with greater or lesser success; and interaction with community members, organizations, and individuals who have been involved in PAR collaborations.Students produce a PAR research proposal, as well as content that can be added to the PAR website.Cunningham Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-9 units An historical and cross-cultural study of the logics and practices of intervention: the ways that individuals, institutions, and governments identify conditions of need or states of emergency within and across borders that require a response.

Examines when a response is viewed as obligatory, when is it deemed unnecessary, and by whom; when the intercession is considered fulfilled; and the rationales or assumptions that are employed in assessing interventions.Theories of the state, globalization, and humanitarianism; power, policy, and institutions; gender, race, and ethnicity; and law, ethics, and morality are examined.139 2-2-5 units Surveys important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present, using film as a lens to explore and interpret aspects of the urban experience in the US and abroad.Topics include industrialization, demographics, diversity, the environment, and the relationship between the community and the individual.Films vary from year to year but always include a balance of classics from the history of film, an occasional experimental/avant-garde film, and a number of more recent, mainstream movies.Students taking undergraduate version complete writing assignments that focus on observation, analysis, and the essay, and give an oral presentation.Glenn Prereq: Permission of instructor 6-0-0 units Students work in teams to create their own design and business narrative, technology and social strategies, and preliminary plan for moving their innovation forward.Lectures and workshops are interspersed with one-on-one critiques with instructors and outside mentors in specific areas of student interest.Students visit SA+P alumni firms to learn how principals have developed their own business, technology, design, and civic platforms.End-of-term presentation highlights important features of their d to 30; preference to students in DesignX Program.246 J DesignX Accelerator (New) Prereq: Permission of instructor 2-4-6 units Students work in entrepreneurial teams to advance innovative ideas, products, services, and firms oriented to design and the built environment.Lectures, demonstrations, and presentations are supplemented by workshop time, when teams interact individually with instructors and industry mentors, and by additional networking events and field trips.At the end of the term, teams pitch for support of their venture to outside investors, accelerators, companies, or d to 30; preference to students in DesignX Program.

Rosenzweig Prereq: None 3-6-3 units Immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games.Explores the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer-based (desktop and handheld) and non-computer-based media.In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

All levels of computer experience welcome.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Klopfer Prereq: None 4-0-8 units Investigates social conflict and distributional disputes in the public sector.While theoretical aspects of conflict and consensus building are considered, focus is on the practice of negotiation and dispute resolution.

Comparisons between unassisted and assisted negotiation are reviewed along with the techniques of facilitation and mediation.Susskind Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Explores the theory and application of the principles of sustainable development as they relate to organizational change management, decision-making processes, goal setting methodology and solution development.Leverages the MIT campus as a living laboratory to gain unique insight into the change management and solution development d to 18.

169 Prereq: Permission of instructor 6-0-12 units Focuses on the synthesis of urban, mixed-use real estate projects, including the integration of physical design and programming with finance and marketing.Interdisciplinary student teams analyze how to maximize value across multiple dimensions in the process of preparing professional development proposals for sites in US cities and internationally.Reviews emerging real estate products and innovative developments to provide a foundation for studio work.Two major projects are interspersed with lectures and field trips.

Integrates skills and knowledge in the MSRED program; also open to other students interested in real estate development.

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Shen Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating urban landscapes and expressing ideas.Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on light, detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and ment limited.

Spirn Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Reviews a range of models for engaging communities, from a client-consultant relationship to advocacy, community organizing, consensus building, capacity building, and knowledge building College Essay Comparison Essay Thesis with Free Bibliography Pages.Spirn Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Reviews a range of models for engaging communities, from a client-consultant relationship to advocacy, community organizing, consensus building, capacity building, and knowledge building.

Considers the ways these different models can be used to strengthen democracy and advance equity in planning processes.McDowell Prereq: Permission of Instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 3-0-9 units In-depth research workshop on pressing environmental design issue of our time, includes discussion and practices of various Landscape-based disciplines used to generate design-based solutions and landscape infrastructural responses to physical urban entropy and decline In many cases, thesis writers may find that the most optimal way in which to complete a thesis is to formally enroll in an AFAS independent study course with their thesis adviser as the instructor. All students interested in writing a thesis should notify the director of undergraduate studies and submit the name of the faculty  .

McDowell Prereq: Permission of Instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 3-0-9 units In-depth research workshop on pressing environmental design issue of our time, includes discussion and practices of various Landscape-based disciplines used to generate design-based solutions and landscape infrastructural responses to physical urban entropy and decline.

Berger 3-0-9 units Studies how ubiquitous and real-time information technology can help us to understand and improve cities and regions In many cases, thesis writers may find that the most optimal way in which to complete a thesis is to formally enroll in an AFAS independent study course with their thesis adviser as the instructor. All students interested in writing a thesis should notify the director of undergraduate studies and submit the name of the faculty  .Berger 3-0-9 units Studies how ubiquitous and real-time information technology can help us to understand and improve cities and regions.Explores the impact of integrating real-time information technology into the built environment.Introduces theoretical foundations of ubiquitous computing.

Provides technical tools for tactile development of small-scale d to 24.Ratti Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-9 units Students develop proposals, at the city and neighborhood scales, that integrate urban design, planning, and digital technology.Aims to create more efficient, responsive, and livable urban places and systems that combine physical form with digital media, sensing, communications, and data analysis.Students conduct field research, build project briefs, and deliver designs or prototypes, while supported by lectures, case studies, and involvement from experts and representatives of subject d to 12.

Ratti Prereq: Permission of instructor 2-0-4 units Develops skills necessary to incubate concepts for new real estate/built environment ventures and to evolve those ideas into viable startup ventures.Addresses the progression of an idea, from inception to opportunity to sustainable business.Guest lecturers share their entrepreneurial paths and relevant experience.

Explores the role of real estate developers in developing/emerging markets, with a focus on solving social development challenges, innovating new development strategies/products, and generating triple bottom-line returns with development projects.Kennedy Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Focuses on key business and legal issues within the principal agreements used to control, entitle, capitalize, and construct a mixed-use real estate development.Through the lens of the real estate developer and its counter-parties, students identify, discuss, and negotiate the most important business issues in right of entry, purchase and sale, development, and joint-venture agreements, as well as a construction contract and construction loan agreement.

Students work closely with attorneys who specialize in the construction of such agreements and with students from area law schools and Columbia University and New York ment limited; preference to MSRED students.McGrath Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Focuses on key business and legal issues within the principal agreements used to lease, finance, and restructure a real estate venture.

Through the lens of the real estate developer and its counter-parties, students identify, discuss and negotiate the most important business issues in office and retail leases, and permanent loan, mezzanine loan, inter-creditor, standstill/forbearance, and loan modification (workout) agreements.Students work closely with attorneys who specialize in the construction of such agreements and with students from area law schools and New York University and Columbia University.Single-asset real estate bankruptcy and the federal income tax consequences of debt restructuring are also ment limited; preference to MSRED students; no Listeners.Torous Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Introduces core components of developing commercial real estate.Explores the process of developing, from initial site selection to site and design planning, entitlements, deal financing, and construction.Includes faculty and industry leader lectures, field trips, and group work on a real-time development case study.

01 or permission of instructor G (Spring) Credit cannot also be received for 11.145 Presents a theory of comparative differences in international housing outcomes.

Introduces institutional differences in the ways housing expenditures are financed, and the economic determinants of housing outcomes, such as construction costs, land values, housing quality, and ownership rates.Analyzes the flow of funds to and from the different national housing finance sectors.Develops an understanding of the greater financial and macroeconomic implications of the mortgage credit sector, and how policies affect the ways housing asset fluctuations impact national economies.Considers the perspective of investors in international real estate markets and the risks and rewards involved.Draws on lessons from an international comparative approach, and applies them to economic and finance policies at the local, state/provincial, and federal levels within a country of choice.

Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.156 3-0-9 units Examines the built, psychosocial, economic, and natural environment factors that affect health behaviors and outcomes.Introduces tools designed to integrate public health considerations into policymaking and planning.Provides extensive practical training in the application of health impact assessment (HIA) methodology, which brings a health lens to policy, budgeting, and planning debates.Emphasizes health equity and healthy cities.Students taking graduate version complete additional d to 30.

Arcaya Prereq: Permission of Instructor 3-0-9 units Practicum workshop on strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level.Growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration.Semester-long projects arranged with student teams serving municipal ence to MCP second year students.255, or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-6 units Examines the history and dynamics of international environmental treaty-making, or what is called environmental diplomacy.Emphasis is on climate change and other atmospheric, marine resource, global waste management and sustainability-related treaties and the problems of implementing them.

Reviews the legal, economic, and political dynamics of managing shared resources, involving civil society on a global basis, and enforcing transboundary agreements.Focuses especially on principles from international relations, international law, environmental management and negotiation theory as they relate to common-pool resource management.Susskind Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-9 units Analysis of local and state power to regulate land use and development.Particular emphasis on the evolution of planning and zoning regulations, and the perceived narrowing of the relationship between public improvements requirements and development impact.

The ability of regulatory bodies to impose environmental performance standards and limit development activity is explored in relation to recent Supreme Court and State SJC decisions.Development decisions rendered by public agencies are reviewed, critiqued, and discussed.148 3-0-9 units Examines the challenges cities face and strategies to prepare for the impacts of climate change.

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Particular attention to the needs of vulnerable populations and resource-constrained cities, global and national adaptation policies and funding mechanisms, and ways in which local government and community-based activities can promote climate-readiness.203; or by permission of instructor Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units Examines theories of infrastructure from science and technology studies, history, economics, and anthropology in order to understand the prospects for change for many new and existing infrastructure systems.Examines how these theories are then implemented within systems in the modern city, including but not limited to, energy, water, transportation, and telecommunications infrastructure Departments Fields of Study City and Regional Planning Cornell nbsp.Examines how these theories are then implemented within systems in the modern city, including but not limited to, energy, water, transportation, and telecommunications infrastructure.

Seminar is conducted with intensive group research projects, in-class discussions and debates.Hsu Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-9 units Examines the history and dynamics of international environmental treaty-making, or what is called environmental diplomacy.

Emphasizes climate change and other atmospheric, marine resource, global waste management and sustainability-related treaties and the problems of implementing them.Reviews the legal, economic, and political dynamics of managing shared resources, involving civil society on a global basis, and enforcing transboundary agreements.Focuses especially on principles from international relations, international law, environmental management, and negotiation theory as they relate to common-pool resource management math.Focuses especially on principles from international relations, international law, environmental management, and negotiation theory as they relate to common-pool resource management.Susskind 2-0-1 units Examines examples of city development that reflect a commitment to the principles of sustainability, including economic development that ensures ecological sustainability, strategies for addressing intercultural tensions, and environmental quality improvements catalyzed by city development.

Susskind Prereq: Permission of Instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 3-0-9 units Examines the sociopolitical, cultural and economic dimensions of the financialization of environmental goods and services.Provides an introduction to key financial terms, practices, and institutions; analyzes the logics and origins of environmental finance, as well as the operation and implications of particular systems such as carbon-trading, REDD and ecosystem service pricing and d to 15.Knox-Hayes Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America.

Explores the role of the city in visions of justice.Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the U., including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing.housing policy, such as private housing finance, public housing policy, state and local housing affordability mechanisms.Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics.Steil Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units Examines the place of US cities in political theory and practice.

Particular attention given to contemporary issues of racial polarization, demographic change, poverty, sprawl, and globalization.Specific cities are a focus for discussion.Thompson Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-6 units Focuses on the connection (or not) between mind (theory) and matter (lived experience).

Examines basic tenets of classical and recent political economic theories and their explication in ideas of market economies, centrally planned economies, social market economies, and co-creative economies.Assesses theories according to their relation to the lived experiences of people in communities and workplaces.Thompson Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units Investigates the evolution of the ideals, the profession, and the practice of city planning throughout history by looking at key ideas that have driven theorists and practitioners.

Explores city and regional planning in the light of broader historical trends, such as changing ideas about who cities are for; different approaches to urban problem-solving; variable factors affecting how urban settlements should be organized and re-organized; the development of human understanding about relationships between the built and natural environments; and about the effects of urban form and organization on society.Focuses substantially but not entirely upon the American experience.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 3-0-9 units Introduces a suite of tools representing the basic set of practices used in the development field.Presents a wealth creation framework that focuses on place, improving livelihoods, incentivizing collaboration, creating multiple forms of wealth, and promoting local ownership.Students work with web-based tools designed for use in a professional setting.

Discussions are based on results from tools, their interpretation, and their meaning.Students develop a series of memos as students they complete assignments.Glasmeier Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring) 4-0-11 units Workshop explores the integration of economic development and physical planning interventions to revitalize urban commercial districts.

Covers: an overview of the causes of urban business district decline, revitalization challenges, and the strategies to address them; the planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from both physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization.Students apply the theories, tools and interventions discussed in class to preparing a formal neighborhood commercial revitalization plan for a client business d to 15.444 J The New Global Planning Practitioner Prereq: Permission of instructor R.Goethert Prereq: None 2-0-1 units Provides students with a concise overview of the range of building systems that are encountered in professional commercial real estate development practice in the USA.Focuses on the relationship between real estate product types, building systems, and the factors that real estate development professionals must consider when evaluating these products and systems for a specific development project.

Surveys commercial building technology including Foundation, Structural, MEP/FP, Envelope, and Interiors systems and analyzes the factors that lead development professionals to select specific systems for specific product types.

One or more field trips to active construction sites may be scheduled during non-class hours based on student availability.Tsipis Prereq: None 3-0-6 units Provides a rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of modern finance including valuation, risk analysis and investment decisions.Where possible, applications and examples drawn from real estate and mortgage markets.Torous Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring) 3-0-6 units Discussions of future directions in the 'smart cities' debate.Begins by framing the current smart city with past trends such as the efficient city movement of the 1930s and the Modernist city of the 1950s and 60s.Examines current trends in big data, civic apps, Code for America, the open data movement, DIY data collections devices, and their policy impacts.Williams Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools.Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning.Williams See description under subject 4.Goethert Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring) 3-0-9 units Introduction to core writings in urban sociology.Explores the nature and changing character of the city and the urban experience, providing context for the development of urban studies research and planning skills.Topics include the changing nature of community, neighborhood effects, social capital and networks, social stratification, feminist theory and critical race theory, and the interaction of social structure and political power.Subject will take place in the Massachusetts Correctional Institution at Norfolk with half of the class from MIT and half of the class from d to 25.

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Steil Prereq: Permission of instructor 3-0-6 units Focuses on disseminating water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) innovations in developing countries, especially among underserved communities.Structured around field-based learning, case studies, lectures and videos.Emphasis on core WASH principles, culture-specific solutions, appropriate and sustainable technologies, behavior change, social marketing and building partnerships Maintenance job description resume urban planning thesis. Thank you letter presentation competitive intelligence resume paragraph on earth day help with college admissions essays. Buy college application essay questions. My political view essay. How to write an introduction to autobiography resume for marketing  .Emphasis on core WASH principles, culture-specific solutions, appropriate and sustainable technologies, behavior change, social marketing and building partnerships.

Term project entails implementing the "next steps" in a WASH innovation in a specific locale and/or a new proposal/plan/project.

Long-term commitment to specific real-world WASH projects which have been disseminated by MIT faculty, students and alumni.Students taking graduate version complete additional d to 30 Yet class sizes are typically small, with multiple section sof required courses offered in both day and evening. Graduates   The program is divided into five components: core courses, specialization courses, electives, internship, and a thesis or project. The overall   UPP 500: History and Theory of Urban Planning UPP 501:  .Students taking graduate version complete additional d to 30.Murcott Prereq: Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units Informs and prepares students to navigate the explicit and implicit power dynamics among stakeholders in decision-making processes that govern the planning and delivery of water and sanitation systems.

Through investigations of organization, regulation, financing, physical delivery, and research designs, students examine the trajectory of decisions that shape and influence the accessibility, affordability, and adequacy of water and sanitation services, particularly in vulnerable neighborhoods in mostly urban and peri-urban areas.Emphasis is placed on the importance of moving beyond the limited dimensions of supply and demand studies and gaining fluency in the multiplicative political-economic and social factors driving choices in water and sanitation systems planning.In-depth, globally comparative readings inform the course, and expose basic services in water and sanitation as a misnomer.Carolini 2-0-7 units Discusses China's daunting urban challenges: congestion and smog, housing affordability, land reform and urban financing, migrants and locals, and social and spatial inequality.

Provides examples of laudable achievements and diverse and innovative responses across more than six hundred cities.Presents China's urbanization as the joint result of natural socioeconomic processes and conscious actions by governments, markets, and the public.Presents multidisciplinary approaches and alternative narratives.Examines the intricate interaction between state and market in China's context, yielding a variety of state-market 'cocktails' devised and experimented in different cities in response to local problems, each involving a multilayered projection onto urban space.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Zhao 3-0-9 units Examines the behavioral foundation for policy design using urban transportation examples.Introduces multiple frameworks for understanding behavior while contrasting the perspectives of classic economic theory with behavioral economics and social psychology.Suggests corresponding policy interventions and establishes a mapping across behavior, theory, and policy.Presents a spectrum of instruments for positively influencing behavior and improving welfare.

Challenges students to critique, design, implement and interpret experiments that nudge travel behavior.Brings behavioral insights to creative design of transport policies that are efficient and equitable as well as simple, consistent, transparent, acceptable, and adaptive to behavioral changes.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Zhao 3-0-9 units Examines globally relevant challenges of adequately and effectively attending to public sector responsibilities for basic services with limited resources.

Particular attention to the contexts of fiscal crises and rapid population growth, as well as shrinkage, through an introduction to methods and processes of budgeting, accounting, and financial mobilization.Case studies and practice exercises explore revenue strategies, demonstrate fiscal analytical competencies, and familiarize students with pioneering examples of promising budget and accounting processes and innovative funding mobilization via taxation, capital markets, and other mechanisms (e.Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.

Carolini Prereq: Permission of Instructor 3-0-9 units Examines the process of economic development to understand why some countries or regions within countries have increased their incomes and reduced their poverty faster than others.Economic development is treated as a process of learning, as countries weigh theories and role models as guides for policy formulation and institution building.Historical and empirical examination of three role models for development/underdevelopment, as formulated by the Third World's new intelligentsia that emerged after de-colonization: the OPEC development role model, the East Asian role model, and the Brazilian role model.Staff Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units Examines legal and institutional arrangements for the establishment, transfer, and control over property under American and selected comparative systems including India and South Africa.

Focuses on key issues of property and land use law regarding planning and economic development.Emphasizes just and efficient resource use; institutional, entitlement and social relational approaches to property; distributional and other social aspects; and the relationship between property, culture, and democracy.Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Rajagopal Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 2-0-10 units Examines the multiple dimensions of governance in international development with a focus on the role of legal norms and institutions in the balance between state and the market.

Analyzes changes in the distribution of political and legal authority as a result of economic globalization.Topics include the regulation of firms; forms of state and non-state monitoring; varieties of capitalism, global governance and development; and good governance, including transparency and accountability mechanisms, the role of the judiciary and legal culture, and tools for measuring governance performance.166 Prereq: None Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered 2-0-10 units Provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the history, foundation, structure, and operation of the human rights movement.

Focuses on key ideas, actors, methods and sources, and critically evaluates the field.Addresses current debates in human rights, including the relationship with security, democracy, development and globalization, urbanization, equality (in housing and other economic and social rights; women's rights; ethnic, religious and racial discrimination; and policing/conflict), post-conflict rebuilding and transitional justice, and technology in human rights activism.Students taking graduate version expected to write a research paper.Rajagopal Prereq: None 2-0-1 units Seminar provides students with a concise overview of the requirements for thesis writing and submission.

Covers types of theses, COUHES requirements, formatting and submission requirements and stipulations.Culminates in submission of thesis proposal.205 or permission of instructor G (Fall, Spring; partial term) 2-2-2 units An introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) as applied to urban and regional planning, community development, and local government.

Emphasis on learning GIS technology and spatial analysis techniques through extensive hands-on exercises using real-world data sets such as the US census of population and housing.Includes a small project on an urban planning problem involving the selection of appropriate methods, the use of primary and secondary data, computer-based modeling, and spatial ment limited; preference to MCP students.Williams Credit cannot also be received for 11.524 Extends the computing and geographic information systems (GIS) skills developed in 11.520 to include spatial data management in client/server environments and advanced GIS techniques.523, introducing database management concepts, SQL (Structured Query Language), and enterprise-class database management software.

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Second half explores advanced features and the customization features of GIS software that perform analyses for decision support that go beyond basic thematic mapping.

Includes the half-term GIS project of 11.524 that studies a real-world planning issue .524 that studies a real-world planning issue.

521 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 2-4-6 units Can be repeated for credit.

Advanced research seminar enhances computer and analytic skills developed in other subjects in this sequence.Students present a structured discussion of journal articles representative of their current research interests involving urban information systems and complete a short research project.Suggested research projects include topics related to ongoing UIS Group research.Ferreira Prereq: Permission of instructor 2-2-2 units Credit cannot also be received for 11.

524 The fundamentals of database management systems as applied to spatial analysis.Includes extensive hands-on exercises using real-world planning data.Introduces database management concepts, SQL (Structured Query Language), and enterprise-class database software.523 or permission of instructor G (Spring; second half of term) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.523 Learning and utilizing advanced geographic information system techniques in studio/lab setting with real-world client problem and complex digital spatial data infrastructure.Projects typically use the client and infrastructure setting for 11.Ferreira Prereq: Permission of Instructor 3-0-9 units Focuses on the integration of land use and transportation planning, drawing from cases in both industrialized and developing countries.Reviews underlying theories, analytical techniques, and the empirical evidence of the land use-transportation relationship at the metropolitan, intra-metropolitan, and micro-scales.Also covers the various ways of measuring urban structure, form, and the "built environment.

" Develops students' skills to assess relevant policies, interventions and impacts.Zegras Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall) 2-1-9 units Focuses on the theory and practice of transportation system finance, examining the range of relevant topics including basic public finance, politics, institutional structures, externalities, pricing, and the role of advanced technologies.Primarily oriented around land-based, surface transportation, although in their research students are welcome to examine air and maritime modes according to their interests.Explores issues across a range of contexts, including North America, Europe, Latin America, and Asia.

Zegras 3-0-9 units Reviews and analyzes federal and state regulation of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, green-house gas emissions, and the production and use of toxic chemicals.Analyzes pollution as an economic problem and the failure of markets.Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions.Emphasizes use of legal mechanisms and alternative approaches (such as economic incentives and voluntary approaches) to control pollution and encourage chemical accident and pollution prevention.

Focuses on the major federal legislation, the underlying administrative system, and the common law in analyzing environmental policy, economic consequences, and the role of the courts.Discusses classical pollutants and toxic industrial chemicals, green-house gas emissions, community right-to-know, and environmental justice.Develops basic legal skills: how to read/understand cases, regulations, and statutes.Students taking graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.Caldart G (Spring) 3-0-9 units Focuses on policy design and evaluation in the regulation of hazardous substances and processes.Includes risk assessment, industrial chemicals, pesticides, food contaminants, pharmaceuticals, radiation and radioactive wastes, product safety, workplace hazards, indoor air pollution, biotechnology, victims' compensation, and administrative law.Health and economic consequences of regulation, as well as its potential to spur technological change, are discussed for each regulator regime.Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.

Caldart Prereq: None 3-0-9 units Studies interactions between planners and institutions at different scales, from local to global/transnational.Emphasizes historical and institutional approaches to development planning.Includes an overview of theories of development, actors, organizational arrangements, and implementation mechanisms.

Covers current topics in development planning, such as migration, participatory planning, urban-rural linkages, corruption, legal institutions and post-conflict development.Analyzes various roles planners play in different institutional cted to first-year MCP and SPURS students.800 Reading, Writing and Research Can be repeated for credit.

Familiarizes students with the practice of planning, by requiring actual experience in professional internship placements.Requires students to both apply what they are learning in their classes in an actual professional setting and to reflect, using a variety of platforms, on the learning personal and professional - growing out of their internship experience.Through readings, practical experience and reflection, empirical observation, and contact with practitioners, students gain deeper general understanding of the practice of the profession.Meets 3 times throughout the term: once at the beginning, midpoint, and end.Daly Prereq: None Units arranged P/D/F Can be repeated for credit.Opportunity for independent study under regular supervision by a faculty member.Staff Prereq: None Units arranged Opportunity for independent study under regular supervision by a faculty member.For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of urban studies and city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged P/D/F Can be repeated for credit.Small group study of advanced subjects under staff supervision.For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

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Small group study of advanced subjects under staff supervision.For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged Can be repeated for credit Explores solutions to present-day challenges by studying social, cultural, political, economic, environmental, and technological events. Examines the   Introduces client-oriented research and the use of urban planning tools. Students   Designed for students writing a thesis in Urban Studies and Planning or Architecture..Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Small group study of advanced subjects under staff supervision.For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction Geography Fitzwilliam College Cambridge.

For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction.

Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged P/D/F Can be repeated for credit Geography Fitzwilliam College Cambridge.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged P/D/F Can be repeated for credit.Small group study of advanced subjects under staff supervision.For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor Units arranged P/D/F Can be repeated for credit.Small group study of advanced subjects under staff supervision.

For graduate students wishing to pursue further study in advanced areas of real estate not covered in regular subjects of instruction.Staff Prereq: Permission of instructor 3.Required CRP Courses: Five CRP Courses The program requires that students take five additional CRP courses at the 3000-level or higher, for a minimum of 3 credits each.Independent study courses (CRP 4900-4970) cannot be applied.Students are encouraged to select courses in consultation with their faculty advisor.

Required CRP courses must be completed at Cornell University.Free Electives Free electives include credit from any successfully completed academic course offered by any department at Cornell.Free electives can be completed for a letter grade or S/U.Please refer to the AAP policy on non-academic creditfor a list of excluded courses.

Rules Governing the URS Program URS students are expected to comply with collegeand program rules.Any deviation must be petitioned prior to the act.Failure to comply with department rules may result in review by the college Academic ReviewCommittee.URS Course Requirements Students may not use any one course to meet more than one specific requirement (i., if a student takes a statistics course to meet the MQR distribution requirement, that same statistics course may not be used to meet the statistics requirement).For courses that satisfy any specific requirement (i., general education, distribution requirements, core requirements for the major, and CRP required courses), the course must be successfully completed with a letter grade, unless a particular course is offered exclusively under the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading basis (SX/UX).Students may not satisfy any general education requirement, distribution requirement, core requirement for the major, or required CRP course requirement with a course completed for fewer than 3 credits.

Advanced Placement Credit AP credit refers to college credit that students earn before they enter Cornell.AP credit may be earned from Advanced Placement (AP), General Certification of Education Advanced Level (“A” Level), International Baccalaureate (IB), and Cornell department (CASE) examinations.Its primary purpose is to exempt students from introductory courses and to place them in advanced courses.Its value is that it allows students to include more advanced courses in their course of study.

AP credit is applied as free elective credit only, with the exception of one First-Year Writing Seminar.

URS students may not apply AP credit to general education requirements in: (1) sciences (PBS); (2) mathematics/quantitative reasoning (MQR); (3) cultural analysis (CA); (4) historical analysis (HA); (5) knowledge, cognition, and moral reasoning (KCM); (6) literature and the arts (LA); and (7) social and behavioral analysis (SBA).Please refer to the AP section of this catalog for additional university guidelines regarding AP credit.Transfer Credit The general college transfer credit policiesapply to all transfer coursework, in addition to the URS-specific processes and policies below.Transfer Credit Review Process All transfer credit is evaluated by the designated Cornell faculty member in the appropriate subject area.To apply transfer course work toward the URS degree, an approved AAP Transfer Credit Request form and a sealed official transcript are required.

 All requests require submission of supporting documentation, including course descriptions, syllabi, and/or portfolio.All approved forms and official transcripts should be submitted to the AAP Office of Admissions and Academic Services, 235 Sibley Dome, Ithaca, NY 14853.Additional Information for Transfer Students To ensure a timely transfer of credit, incoming transfer students are required to submit final transcripts immediately upon acceptance.Students should also meet with the director of undergraduate studies and the AAP Office of Admissions and Academic Services during orientation to review how their credits are applied toward the Cornell degree and for course enrollment planning.Students who transfer into the URS program must successfully complete: A minimum of four semesters in residence A minimum of 60 academic credits at Cornell 30 of the 60 credits must include the five required CRP courses for the major (CRP 1100 , CRP 1101 , CRP 2000 , CRP 2010 , and CRP 3210 ) and the five required CRP courses.

* Deviating from Curriculum, Policies, or Procedures Students wishing to enroll in fewer than 12 or more than 20 credit hours, seek a substitution for a specific graduation requirement, deviate from any college or department policy, or adjust enrollment after the add/drop period must petition the department for permission.Petitions must be submitted prior to the act.Further, students wishing to take more than the standard number of credit hours should have a cumulative grade point average of 3.Petitions should be submitted only if there are clearly extraordinary circumstances that merit special consideration.

In order for a petition to be approved, circumstances must be extenuating.Once submitted and acted upon, petitions can only be reversed by subsequent petition.Appeals: A student has ten days from the time of the petitions decision to appeal the decision in writing.Appeals should be submitted directly to the Department of City and Regional Planning for review and vote by the full tenure/tenure-track faculty.The faculty decision on the appeal is final.

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Concurrent Degree Option The five-year concurrent degree option allows students to earn a B.in Urban and Regional Studies as well as a bachelor of arts (B.) from Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences, or a B Where to buy an urban studies thesis without plagiarism MLA 123 pages / 33825 words single spaced Writing from scratch.) from Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences, or a B.

from Cornell’s colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, or Human Ecology.Students usually apply to the concurrent degree option during their second year.Once admitted, they are assigned an advisor in each college to assist with course planning and graduation requirements Buy college application essay questions CBS Boring.

Once admitted, they are assigned an advisor in each college to assist with course planning and graduation requirements.

Concurrent degree candidates must satisfy all requirements for both degrees and a minimum of 150 academic credits.Off-Campus Study Opportunities In addition to on-campus studies, URS students are encouraged to take advantage of the university’s resources for international research and education. Most URS students choose to spend a semester at Cornell in Rome, usually during the spring semester of junior year.Other URS students participate in semester-long Cornell Abroadand/or Cornell in Washingtonprograms.Cornell in Rome The urban studies component of Cornell in Rome is offered during the spring semester for students interested in the economic, political, cultural, and social life of contemporary European cities and regions.

Eligibility Requirements URS students in their third or fourth year of study are eligible to participate in Cornell in Rome.To be eligible for Cornell in Rome, URS students are required to have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 or better, and to have successfully completed CRP 1100 , CRP 1101 , CRP 2000 , CRP 2010 , and the economics requirements prior to the Rome semester.Students are admitted by application and review of their record.Application is made by December 1 of the preceding year to the AAP Office of Admissions and Academic Services.

For additional information, visit the Cornell in Rome website.Schedule Requirements Students are required to enroll in CRP 4160 - Rome Workshop , a 6-credit field research course that defines the semester.It requires students to spend about 20 hours per week in assigned peripheral neighborhoods exploring such issues as public space, urban design, social housing, infrastructure services, immigrant integration, tourism, historic preservation, and economic development challenges.Additionally, students typically enroll in courses in art history, architecture history, photography, contemporary art, and Italian, along with architecture, art, and visiting students.URS students may fulfill in-department electives, distribution requirements, and free electives in Rome.

Honors Program URS offers qualified students the opportunity to write an honors thesis.To be eligible for the honors program, students must at least have completed the junior year, completed four semesters registered in URS, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.700 in the major (including the microeconomics and statistics requirements), and have completed at least 10 of the 12 courses in the major.

Once admitted, an honors student selects a faculty advisor and develops and writes a thesis with close guidance.

URS Seniors URS seniors may also apply to earn an accelerated Master of Regional Planning (M.If admitted to this highly selective program, a student must: Complete 60 credits, at least 30 of which must be obtained within the Department of City and Regional Planning, including credits earned in fulfilling the M.Interested URS majors are encouraged to take graduate credit options in upper division classes where possible to fulfill some of the 60 credits.

Complete the independent work requirement by submitting an acceptable thesis, professional report, or research paper.Two bound copies of the work need to be submitted to the graduate field coordinator.program requirements also apply to the accelerated M.The accelerated degree option will generally allow a student to complete the M.P degree in three semesters if graduate level credits were completed during their URS program., where the student has completed a qualifying, credit-bearing internship) the accelerated degree option can be completed in two semesters.URS students are encouraged to work for a year or two before returning for the accelerated M.Interested students should meet with their advisor and develop a plan during the last two years of the URS program.Please note the following guidelines for acceptable M.work: No grades below C- will be acceptable for meeting the 60-credit-hour requirement.

No more than six hours of grades of C-, C, or C+ will be accepted for meeting the 60-credit-hour requirement.Partial credit from a class could be used in calculating this six-hour maximum (e., if a student has received C in two 4-credit classes, only 6 of these 8 credits can count toward the degree.Classes not related in some way to the student’s degree will not be counted in the 60 credits.Examples of such classes include wine tasting, culinary arts, English as a second language, dance, and physical education.Incomplete class work must be completed by the beginning of that semester one year hence.

For information on admissions requirements and how to apply, contact the Department of City and Regional Planning office.

Urban Studies Minor (non-URS majors) The Urban and Regional Studies (URS) minor has been formulated specifically for out-of-department students who are interested in complementing their current academic program with an introduction to various facets of urban studies (domestic, environmental, international, professional, or urban affairs).To complete the URS minor, students must take at least six courses (minimum total of 18 credits) in the Department of City and Regional Planning (CRP).Courses must be completed with letter grade of C or better.Specific Course Requirements for the Minor 1.